Grinding grooves aboriginal

Grinding Grooves Aboriginal

Daves ACT: ABORIGINAL GRINDING GROOVES - VIDEO

Nov 09, 2010 · "The grinding grooves are located on an area of exposed flat rock, up-slope from the two eucalypt trees. Aboriginal people used this area extensively for grinding stones into sharp edges for use as axes. There are some 50 shallow grooves worn into the surface of the exposed sandstone rock extending over several metres.

Buried Aboriginal axe grooves uncovered and ... - ABC News

Jun 15, 2017 · Rock art conservation: Volunteers uncover past of Aboriginal axe head grinding grooves. Rock art conservation expert David Lambert said the grooves had been made by Aboriginal people sitting by pools of water and grinding their stone axe heads, usually made of basalt, into the sandstone to sharpen them.

Fact sheet: Aboriginal axe-grinding grooves

What are Aboriginal axe-grinding grooves? Axe-grinding grooves are oval-shaped indentations in sandstone outcrops. Aboriginal people made the grooves when they shaped and sharpened stone axes by grinding them against the sandstone. Flat, low outcrops of fine-grained sandstone were used to give stone axe heads a sharp cutting edge.

Daves ACT: ABORIGINAL AXE GRINDING GROOVES

Apr 21, 2010 · ABORIGINAL AXE GRINDING GROOVES. The local Aboriginal tribe, the Ngunawal peoples, consists of a number of different clans bounded by the broad language groups of Wiradjuri, Ngrio (Ngarigo), Gundungurra and Yuin. The Tuggeranong plain of Canberra is at the southern extremity of Ngunawal country.

Ngambri Grinding Grooves - YouTube

Aug 01, 2011 · The grinding grooves are located on an area of exposed flat rock, up-slope from the two eucalypt trees. Aboriginal people used this area extensively for grinding stones into sharp edges for use as ...

Guide to Aboriginal sites and places - Creative Spirits

Aboriginal grinding grooves. Because Aboriginal people needed water to wet the surface of the softer rock when they sharpened their tools grinding grooves (top right) are usually found close to water. Axes were made of hard but smooth river stones, firmly fixed to a wooden handle with locally made twine and glue.

File:Aboriginal grinding grooves, Dobroyd Head, New South ...

Aboriginal_grinding_grooves,_Dobroyd_Head,_New_South_Wales.jpg ‎ (509 × 325 pixels, file size: 310 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons . Information from its description page there is shown below.

Aboriginal Sites Awareness - Aboriginal Heritage

Axe Grinding Grooves (Above) The grinding grooves are made from Aboriginal people sharpening their stone axe heads. The axes were constructed from hard volcanic stone fastened to a wooden handle. To sharpen the axe, water is put on to the wet rock and the axe is rubbed backwards and forward until the stone is sharp.

ABORIGINAL Site Identi AXE-GRINDING GROOVES

Jun 13, 2008 · Axe-grinding grooves are oval-shaped indentations in sandstone outcrops. Aboriginal people made the grooves when they shaped and sharpened stone axes by grinding them against the sandstone. Flat, low outcrops of fi ne-grained sandstone were used to give stone axe heads a sharp cutting edge.

Terramungamine Reserve and the Terramungamine Rock Grooves ...

Terramungamine Reserve area was part of the traditional country of the Tubbagah People of the Wiradjuri Nation and an important gathering area for tribes throughout the region. It is the site of the Terramungamine grinding grooves that were used by the Aborigine people for sharpening their tools and weapons.

Aboriginal sites of New South Wales - Wikipedia

In addition to pictorial carvings, there are many grinding grooves, caused by grinding stone implements on a rock surface to shape them and give them an edge. Areas like Sydney and the Blue Mountains have many rock carvings because they predominantly consist of sandstone (known as Hawkesbury sandstone), which is a very suitable surface for rock carvings.

Terramungamine Reserve - Dubbo - WeekendNotes

Aboriginal groovings, burial sites and Cobb and Co days. The grinding grooves are a type of Aboriginal site formed from aboriginals sharpening their axes, spears and even grinding seeds in this area. Grooving areas were often also a meeting site for other tribes, a chance to catch up on the gossip of the land.

Jewells Swamp - Aboriginal heritage: Community History ...

There remain numerous sites of Aboriginal axe grinding grooves in the area. The Jewells Swamp holds deep cultural significance and the swamp at one time held a remarkable feature, a floating island; that disappeared with the inrush of sand processing: The …

Digging into New Englands Aboriginal past - University of ...

The grooves are a physical document of Aboriginal tool-work – the shaping and sharpening of stone axes and spear heads. Dr Beck said that earlier work by UNE archaeologists suggests it took 80-100 hours of patient grinding to turn a stone blank into a capable edged axe.

Fact sheet: Aboriginal grinding stones

Grinding stones were among the largest stone implements of Aboriginal people. They were used to crush, grind or pound different materials. A main function of grinding stones was to process many types of stone for cooking.

Aboriginal Grinding Grooves at Kings Tableland - Sydney

At the top of Kings Tableland Plateau, you venture across the rocky surface that has scattered groove markings created by Aboriginals sharpening spears, grinding them against the rocks, and sharpening axeheads.

A Woodsrunners Diary: Theodore Aboriginal Axe Grinding ...

Oct 01, 2018 · "I noticed particularly, one family of about 12 in number. The man carried an axe and a gun on his shoulders. The Wife, the rim of a spinning wheel in one hand, and a loaf of bread in the other. Several little boys and girls, each with a bundle, according to their size Two poor horses, each heavily loaded with some poor necessities. On the top of the baggage of …

Last Article: Used Concrete Plants For Sale   Next Article: Mls3726 Vrm Quartz Grinding Mill

Related articles:

2006-2021 © All rights reserved
Add: New Technical Industry Development Area, Zhengzhou, Henan, China. Postcode: 450001
E-mail: [email protected]